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Age of Einstein, The

AuthorFrank Firk Entered2004-03-13 11:06:16 by bcrowell
Editedit data record FreedomPublic domain (disclaimer)
SubjectQ.C - Physics
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platonistic
by Ben Crowell (crowell09 at stopspam.lightandmatter.com (change 09 to current year)) on 2004-03-13 11:47:55, review #394
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Near the beginning of this book, Dr. Firk gives the following long quote from Einstein: This is a misleading use of the quote, and a poor way to start off a book intended for a general audience. First, Firk fails to note that Einstein's attitude was, and still is, far outside the mainstream of physics. Firk is also being misleading by removing the quote from its historical context and presenting it to laypeople who don't know the history; Einstein invented relativity because he was unsatisfied with the then-standard description of light as an electromagnetic wave, which had been derived entirely from experiments.

This book follows the same philosophy and order of topics as Firk's much more mathematical book Essential Physics: relativity is introduced before Newton's laws, and is initially justified based on a metaphysical argument about the symmetry of space and time that bears no resemblance to Einstein's reasons for inventing it, and makes no reference to observable reality.

For the reader who wants a nonmathematical, free introduction to relativity, I'd suggest simply reading Einstein's own popularization of his work, titled Relativity, which is now in the public domain, and available on the web. It covers much of the same ground, at the same level, and without making the same mistakes.

Disclaimer: I knew Dr. Firk, although not well, when I was a graduate student at Yale.

Information wants to be free, so make some free information.


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