The Assayer: G-Dimensional Theory & The Smarandache Quantum Paradoxes: Comparative Logic and Modern Quantum Theory The Assayer - book reviews and discussion for the free-information renaissance
home    help    links    log in    log out    add or review a book    contact
Browse by    subject    author    title    reviewer

G-Dimensional Theory & The Smarandache Quantum Paradoxes: Comparative Logic and Modern Quantum Theory

AuthorL. Stephen Young Entered2004-10-07 18:33:55 by karanda
Editedit data record FreedomCopylefted, but with restrictions on modification and/or sale (disclaimer)
SubjectQ.C - Physics
Read
http://fs.gallup.unm.edu/physics.htm
This link was reported to be broken by user Ben Crowell on 2005-01-03 10:28:06
You can't update this URL or report it OK or broken because you aren't logged in.
ReviewYou can't add a review of this book right now because you're not logged in.
Notify
A new point of view
by Karanda ramsharan on 2004-10-07 18:33:55, review #426
content
typical
writing
typical
G Dimensional Theory, a unique, logical and physically congruent system of physics, at significant variance with modern and classical theory, is presented in Sections 3-4. A comparative analysis is done in Section 5 of the Smarandache quantum paradoxes, which are the following: 1) Invisible paradox: Our visible world is composed of a totality of invisible particles; 2) Uncertainty Paradox: Large matter, which is under the 'determinist principle', is formed by a totality of elementary particles, which are under Heisenberg's 'indeterminacy principle'; 3) Unstable Paradox: Stable matter is formed by unstable elementary particles (elementary particles decay when free); 4) Short Time Living Paradox: Long time living matter is formed by very short time living elementary particles.


You cannot revise or reply to this post because you are not logged in.

crank literature
by Ben Crowell (crowell09 at stopspam.lightandmatter.com (change 09 to current year)) on 2008-02-09 17:59:05, review #503
http://www.lightandmatter.com
content
typical
writing
typical
This is the usual crank literature that you can expect from anything with "Smarandache" in the title. It gets off to an especially unpromising start by giving a reference in the first sentence to a paper in Nature that doesn't seem to exist. Silly juvenilia dressed up with fancy words to make it sound impressive.

Information wants to be free, so make some free information.


You cannot revise or reply to this post because you are not logged in.

The contents of this web page, except the parts contributed by members of The Assayer, are copyright (c) 2000 by Benjamin Crowell, and are copyleft licensed under the Open Publication License 1.0, without options A or B.