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Scientist and Engineer's Guide to Digital Signal Processing, The

AuthorSteven W. Smith Entered2000-12-28 21:24:09 by cpereda
Editedit data record FreedomCopyrighted, doesn't cost money to read, but otherwise not free (disclaimer)
SubjectQ.A - Mathematics. Computer science (digital signal processing)
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http://www.DSPguide.com
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A great intro to DSP
by cpereda on 2000-12-28 21:24:09, review #65
content
better than 98%
writing
better than 99%
The author has a great writing style and presents the material in a way that makes DSP very accessible.


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A "guide" for scientists and engineers? I think not.
by Ryan Scott on 2005-05-29 08:51:21, review #451
content
substandard
writing
typical
This book, whose title is deceptively Scientists_and_Engineer's_Guide_to_Digital_Signal_Processing, seems to be written more for adequately prepared high school seniors rather than scientists or engineers. I'm an electrical and computer engineering undergraduate, and I can certainly say that the level of detail in this "guide" is terrible for the most part. I can say that some of the explanations are unique and indeed intuitive; however, that is the book's only merit. A good DSP engineer needs to be more mathematically adept at approaching such problems, and *every* practicing engineer in this field will certainly be exposed to software used in industry. From a software standpoint, the techniques and intuitions involved really need more experimentation with systematic techniques to more rigorously justify steps taken in the software experiments. Finally, I have to say that if you want to be a patent lawyer for companies involved strictly with DSP design, then this book is your treasure. But for the scientists and engineers out there who want to do more than talk about DSP over beer at the local hangout to impress the opposite sex, definitely look elsewhere. This book teaches next to nothing about actual *design* using DSP techniques.


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good for newbies
by Arun kumar on 2007-08-04 08:06:23, review #498
content
better than 80%
writing
better than 95%
I Found this book good for newbies who want to know what it is needed to be in this field. It gives good overview of all the topics and gives program examples, though not in C. If someone wants to dwell deep into this field see books like signals and systems By Alan V. Opeheimer or book with same title by B.P Lathi. Those who want to get into field like speech processing they should see books like Discrete Time speech Signal proceesing by Thomas F Quateri or better an introdutory book like Fundemental Of Speech Processing by Rabiner


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